Tag Archives: Farmington Hills Condominium Attorney

Business Interruption and Loss of Use Insurance Claims Resulting from COVID-19

In Michigan, as in most states, the state authority has significantly limited access to public places, stores, restaurants, movie theaters, offices, and other businesses through the issuance of executive orders prohibiting such access. For businesses whose viability depends on the public’s ability to access that business’ physical location, the issuance of such orders has resulted in a loss of use of the property and a severe interruption in business. For some, their insurance policies may appear to insure against loss of use of the insured property when a civil authority prohibits the insured from using the insured property, such as through issuance of an executive prohibiting such access, or there is damage to the property resulting in its loss of use. While it may seem as though the business climate created by the Coronavirus (COVID-19) is unique to our generation, this is not the first time a Governor’s executive order has impacted businesses in Michigan and there are several cases from the Michigan Court of Appeals which can provide guidance.

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Kevin Hirzel’s interview on Law and Crime Network, Covid-19 Law Q&A

Law & Crime Network recently interviewed Kevin Hirzel regarding national issues that are arising due to the Covid-19 crisis . In this Q & A, Kevin Hirzel addresses rent and mortgage concerns, loan modifications, State Executive Orders and Federal stimulus efforts. Viewers from around the nation have questions and concerns about this pandemic and want to know what rights they have. Covid-19 is causing housing concerns across the nation and Kevin Hirzel provides advice on how to navigate this national crisis.  The interview can he found here.

Kevin Hirzel is the Managing Member of Hirzel Law, PLC and concentrates his practice on commercial litigation, community association law, condominium law, Fair Housing Act compliance, homeowners association and real estate law. Mr. Hirzel is a fellow in the College of Community Association Lawyers, a prestigious designation given to less than 175 attorneys in the country. He has been a Michigan Super Lawyer’s Rising Star in Real Estate Law from 2013-2019, an award given to only 2.5% of the attorneys in Michigan each year. Mr. Hirzel has been named a Leading Lawyer in Condominium & HOA law by Leading Lawyers Magazine in 2018 and 2019, an award given to less than 5% of the attorneys in Michigan each year. He represents community associations, condominium associations, cooperatives, homeowners associations, property owners and property managers throughout Michigan. He may be reached at (248) 478-1800 or [email protected]

The Dangers of Owning Property as Joint Tenants with Full Rights of Survivorship

There are several ways in which property can be held by multiple owners.  For married couples, one of the most commonly used estates is the tenancy by the entireties.  It provides a right of survivorship that enables a surviving spouse to hold property without having to proceed with probate.  In Michigan, this estate is only available to married couples.  In some instances, parties may seek to mimic the right of survivorship contained in a tenancy by the entirety by holding property as joint tenants with a full right of survivorship.  Similar to a tenancy by the entireties, this estate cannot be unilaterally severed by the act of one of the parties, and it provides an indestructible right of survivorship to the surviving joint tenants.  This may make it appear to be a more attractive option, in some circumstances, to a tenancy in common which is the presumptive estate for unmarried individuals in Michigan.  However, parties seeking to utilize a joint tenancy with full right of survivorship should be aware of the risks that come with such an estate.

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The Evolving Landscape of Sex Discrimination in Housing

Aimee Stephens worked as a funeral director for R.G. and G.R. Harris Funeral Home in Garden City, Michigan for several years. Throughout that time, she struggled with her gender identity and, in 2013, she began dressing as a woman at work. The funeral home’s dress code was strictly gender-based and Stephens’ refusal to dress as a man, in compliance with the gender-based dress code, resulted in her termination (see more information here). Aimee Stephens filed a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (the “EEOC”), alleging her termination was the result of unlawful sex discrimination. The EEOC brought a lawsuit against the funeral home in the Eastern District of Michigan and the case is now in front of the United States Supreme Court, with oral arguments recently heard on October 8, 2019 (see more information here). Read more