Category Archives: Michigan Condominium Attorney

Are the CDC’s Restrictions on Halting Residential Evictions in Michigan Constitutional?

In Michigan, residential evictions are normally handled at the local District Court pursuant to Michigan’s Summary Proceedings to Recover Possession of Premises, MCL 600.5701, et seq. However, on September 1, 2020, the Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (the “CDC”) issued an order (the “Order“) temporarily halting some, but not all, residential evictions throughout the country, including Michigan, to prevent the further spread of COVID-19. The Order is presently in effect through December 31, 2020, but may be extended or modified in the future. The CDC’s Order upended the normal residential eviction process and thrown interpretation of the Order to the Michigan Supreme Court Administrator’s Office (“SCAO”) and the local District Courts throughout the State of Michigan.

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WHEN CAN A MUNICIPALITY IMPOSE A TAX LIEN AGAINST PROPERTY FOR UNPAID WATER CHARGES?

Most people who own real estate obtain their water for the property from the local municipality. While the timing of billing and costs for water charges vary among municipalities, all municipalities are given the right under Michigan law to collect delinquent water charges through imposing a lien against the property. Specifically, MCL 123.162 provides:

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Checking the List Twice: Buying a Condominium Unit in Michigan During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Buying a new home can be a stressful, frustrating experience – buying a home during the COVID-19 pandemic may be even worse.  By the time you have found the perfect home, you may just want to sign all the papers put in front of you; however, whether buying a condominium unit during a pandemic or not, you should carefully review these documents and ensure you have been provided with all the information you need to make an informed purchase.

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On the Waterfront: Fighting Lakefront Erosion Through Easement Maintenance

On February 12, 2020, the Ottawa County Circuit Court issued a decision in the consolidated cases Duke, et al v Wittenbach, et al, Case No 19-5989-CH and Wittenbach v Duke, et al, Case No 19-5995-CH.  The Duke cases are interesting because at first glance they appear to arise out of the intersection of riparian rights and property owner rights but are ultimately resolved through the application of the ordinary easement principles described in more detail below.  Nonetheless, given the increase in Great Lakes water levels, the issues presented in the Duke cases may resurface in future cases, and the Court’s means of resolving the dispute could be applied in any such future cases.

 

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The Evolving Landscape of Sex Discrimination in Housing

Aimee Stephens worked as a funeral director for R.G. and G.R. Harris Funeral Home in Garden City, Michigan for several years. Throughout that time, she struggled with her gender identity and, in 2013, she began dressing as a woman at work. The funeral home’s dress code was strictly gender-based and Stephens’ refusal to dress as a man, in compliance with the gender-based dress code, resulted in her termination (see more information here). Aimee Stephens filed a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (the “EEOC”), alleging her termination was the result of unlawful sex discrimination. The EEOC brought a lawsuit against the funeral home in the Eastern District of Michigan and the case is now in front of the United States Supreme Court, with oral arguments recently heard on October 8, 2019 (see more information here). Read more

Hirzel Law on Fox 2 News involving controversial Westland boundary dispute

Hirzel Law, PLC has been hired to resolve a boundary dispute between the owners of lots in a platted subdivision and the developer of a proposed 88 unit site condominium in Westland, Michigan.  The attorneys at Hirzel Law, PLC have had previous success in representing clients on issues related to adverse possession and acquiescence.  The proposed development is on the site of the former Nankin Mills Elementary School that closed in 2006 and was demolished in 2014.  The boundary  between the subdivision and proposed development has been established by fence lines for decades.  The developer has thus far refused to maintain the existing boundary lines and has submitted plans that would require the removal of portions of fences and landscaping from various yards in the subdivision.  The news story can be viewed here.

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